Roh Tae-Woo, South Korean Leader as It Moved Toward Democracy, Dies at 88

SEOUL — Roh Tae-woo, South Korea’s last military-backed president who forged ties with Communist foes, tolerated the country’s rambunctious transition from dictatorship to democracy but ended up in jail for mutiny and corruption, died on Tuesday. He was 88. Mr. Roh died in an intensive care unit at Seoul National University Hospital, the hospital said,… Continue reading Roh Tae-Woo, South Korean Leader as It Moved Toward Democracy, Dies at 88

Aung San Suu Kyi to Defend Herself in Myanmar ‘Show Trial’

More than eight months after she was detained by the military in a coup, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of Myanmar’s ousted civilian government, and her lawyers were set to mount her defense for the first time on Tuesday in a closed-door hearing. Ms. Aung San Suu Kyi, 76, was scheduled to appear… Continue reading Aung San Suu Kyi to Defend Herself in Myanmar ‘Show Trial’

China Locks Down City of 4 Million to Subdue Covid Outbreak

The Chinese government ordered the northwestern city of Lanzhou locked down on Tuesday as officials carried out widespread testing to quash a small Covid-19 outbreak. Lanzhou, a city of about four million people, reported six new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, and a total of 39 over the past week. China, where the coronavirus first emerged… Continue reading China Locks Down City of 4 Million to Subdue Covid Outbreak

Your Tuesday Briefing – The New York Times

We’re covering Sudan’s coup and a conviction in Hong Kong under the national security law. Coup in Sudan Sudan’s military seized power on Monday, detaining the prime minister and other civilian political leaders. The unfolding coup appeared to deal a sweeping blow to hopes for a democratic transition in one of Africa’s largest countries. Lt.… Continue reading Your Tuesday Briefing – The New York Times

Hong Kong’s National Security Law Explained

HONG KONG — A Hong Kong court on Monday convicted an activist of inciting secession for shouting pro-independence slogans at a series of protests, underlining the power of a sweeping national security law to punish speech. The activist, Ma Chun-man, had argued that he had not been calling for Hong Kong’s independence from China, but… Continue reading Hong Kong’s National Security Law Explained

With New Conviction, Hong Kong Uses Security Law to Clamp Down on Speech

HONG KONG — A Hong Kong court on Monday convicted an activist of inciting secession for shouting pro-independence slogans at a series of protests, underlining the power of a sweeping national security law to punish speech. The activist, Ma Chun-man, had argued that he had not been calling for Hong Kong’s independence from China, but… Continue reading With New Conviction, Hong Kong Uses Security Law to Clamp Down on Speech

Heavy Is the Burden on Japan’s Royal Women

TOKYO — One of the toughest places to be a woman in Japan is within its royal family. Nearly three decades ago, Empress Michiko lost the ability to speak after public carping about her supposed shortcomings as the wife of Emperor Akihito. Ten years later, Michiko’s daughter-in-law, the current Empress Masako, retreated from public duties… Continue reading Heavy Is the Burden on Japan’s Royal Women